Mind the gap

Interesting to see that the Tube’s announcer has been sacked.
I wonder who’ll replace her? Give the recent trend, as observed at Dubai and Amsterdam airports recently, I hope it won’t be someone with an estuary English accent (or common accent, depending on your point of view). Yawr flaiit is leavin nah from gate fowrteen.
Being a bit conservative on these matters, I prefer a standard for these kinds of things and it’s
Received Pronunciation, as learnt by millions of non-native English speakers. A Geordie, Essex or Mancunian accent just isn’t right – give us Posh English, as understood by everyone and able to be laughed at by Brits without fear of upsetting any one community.
Most people learn English hearing Received Pronunciation – a decent standard from which to branch out and learn other regional variations. Of course, the fact that my accent is close to Received Pronunciation, giving me a potential advantage, has no influence on my particular preference.
I remember a few years ago when everything went Posh Scottish. Why was the photo booth I was sitting in in London suddenly occupied by a Scottish Lady? What had happened to the retired BBC newsreader who used to live there? Very confusing.
Recorded announcements at British railways stations have removed some local colour. I remember when I was 14 or 15, going off to London to go skateboarding. Lots of the announcements were made by local staff in strong West Indian or Jamaican accents. Exciting, but often hard to understand.
Dis um traaain goin to Richmoooond!

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3 Responses to “Mind the gap”

  1. Paul Davies Says:

    Chris,
    It sounds like you’re yearning for the days when travellers on the London Underground were warned to "Maiind the gepp":-)
    Your post also reminds me of this old joke:
    Q. What’s a creche?
    A. A collision between two motor vehicles in Tonbridge Wells.

  2. Michael Geisler Says:

    Oh go on…go for one of the Antipodean accents – the nasal Aussie accent..but even better (and in some ways very British) the classic New Zealand accent – ‘train departing on platform sex’

  3. Chris Says:

    I think we need to go back to the 40s and have a nice posh accent of the type Mr Davies describes – digital technology could probably whip up Noel Coward delivering public safety messages in a rather posh, camp and slightly condescending vein.

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Mind the gap

Interesting to see that the Tube’s announcer has been sacked.
I wonder who’ll replace her? Give the recent trend, as observed at Dubai and Amsterdam airports recently, I hope it won’t be someone with an estuary English accent (or common accent, depending on your point of view). Yawr flaiit is leavin nah from gate fowrteen.
Being a bit conservative on these matters, I prefer a standard for these kinds of things and it’s
Received Pronunciation, as learnt by millions of non-native English speakers. A Geordie, Essex or Mancunian accent just isn’t right – give us Posh English, as understood by everyone and able to be laughed at by Brits without fear of upsetting any one community.
Most people learn English hearing Received Pronunciation – a decent standard from which to branch out and learn other regional variations. Of course, the fact that my accent is close to Received Pronunciation, giving me a potential advantage, has no influence on my particular preference.
I remember a few years ago when everything went Posh Scottish. Why was the photo booth I was sitting in in London suddenly occupied by a Scottish Lady? What had happened to the retired BBC newsreader who used to live there? Very confusing.
Recorded announcements at British railways stations have removed some local colour. I remember when I was 14 or 15, going off to London to go skateboarding. Lots of the announcements were made by local staff in strong West Indian or Jamaican accents. Exciting, but often hard to understand.
Dis um traaain goin to Richmoooond!

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